Frail 85-year-old Wedged In Two Chairs For Seven Days- Daily Mail newspaper- Exclusive news story- ***October 2010***

We were contacted by the daughter of Revaben Parmar- 85 year old woman who was kept in two chairs for a week while the care home waited for a specialist bed to be delivered.


Mrs Pamar's daughter was furious at her mother's treatment and wanted to highlight what had happened.


She was delighted with the article which appeared as an exclusive in the Daily Mail newspaper.


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HOW A CARE HOME KEPT A FRAIL 85-YEAR-OLD WOMAN

Daily Mail newspaper

Frail and confused after breaking her ankle in a fall, 85-year-old Revaben Parmar needed to be kept as comfortable as possible.

Instead, she spent a week slumped across two armchairs pushed together because the care home where she lived could not provide a suitable bed.

Her outraged daughter Lalita Parmar only found out by chance that she was being kept in the lounge around the clock.

Degrading: Revaben Parmar had to sleep in the lounge

Degrading: Revaben Parmar had to sleep in the lounge

And when she complained, she was shocked to be told the degrading arrangement was in her mother's 'best interests'.On top of that, a boss at the home criticised her for trying to make staff there 'feel guilty' by speaking out.

Yesterday the 54-year-old herself a nurse demanded action be taken against the home and warned that other pensioners could be enduring similar experiences without their families' knowledge.

The case highlights the poor treatment at some hospitals and care homes that prompted the Mail's award-winning Dignity for the Elderly campaign.

'My mum seemed really tired when I visited her, but I just put it down to the effects of her injury,' her daughter said yesterday. 'I was absolutely horrified when I found out she was being kept on the chairs the whole time.

'I'm sure it slowed her recovery, and it was very undignified, plus I had a right to be told. It's inhumane. Don't the staff there have any conscience?'

She visited her mother in the lounge at Grosvenor Mews care home in Stockport, Greater Manchester, every day following her discharge from hospital on June 12, but assumed she was being put to bed in her room as usual each night.

Because the great-grandmother who came to Britain from Gujarat in the 1960s after being widowed suffers from dementia, she was unable to tell her daughter what was going on. She found out only after a care worker mentioned that Mrs Parmar could not listen to her beloved traditional Indian music because she was not sleeping in her room.

Letter: Grosvenor Mews operations director Eddie Kasprowicz insisted 'nothing disgraceful, appalling, irresponsible or inhumane took place in regard to your mother's care'.

Letter: Grosvenor Mews operations director Eddie Kasprowicz insisted 'nothing disgraceful, appalling, irresponsible or inhumane took place in regard to your mother's care'.

Mrs Parmar's daughter took a photo of her wedged into the straight-backed armchair in the home's lounge with her legs propped up on a second chair pushed in front of it.

After she complained to staff, a manager wrote back saying the arrangement had been made because Mrs Parmar had been trying to get out of her bed, which did not have bars at the side. She was therefore left in the lounge all night while a suitable hospital bed was ordered so she could be 'more closely observed'.

In the letter, operations director Eddie Kasprowicz insisted 'nothing disgraceful, appalling, irresponsible or inhumane took place in regard to your mother's care'.

And he added: 'I believe that this decision was taken in your mother's best interest and the staff should not be made to feel guilty because of it.'

Mrs Parmar was given a suitable bed six days after her discharge from hospital.
But her daughter decided to remove her from the home where her place was funded by social services topped up by her pension and she is now at another establishment.

Her daughter complained to Stockport Council which, following an investigation, accepted that being denied a bed had caused Mrs Parmar 'considerable stress' and should never have happened.

She has taken legal advice about compensation and has complained to the Care Quality Commission. 'It's scary to think I might never have known about this if the care worker hadn't let it slip,' she said.

'How many other care homes think that's an appropriate way to act with vulnerable people who aren't able to protest about their treatment?'




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